Wildfires in the forest fire articles 2021 West

Wildfires in the forest fire articles 2021 West

Thousands of homes were destroyed last year in the Almeda Fire — Oregon’s most destructive in years. Many residents are still displaced. What keeps them from leaving? Unbreakable bonds.
As drought, record heat and wildfire smoke seize the Pacific Northwest, farm owners and fieldworkers struggle to adapt. Sometimes the response feels improvised or inadequate.
Wildfires in the forest fire articles 2021 WestWildfires in the forest fire articles 2021 West
By Christopher Flavelle and Zolan Kanno-Youngs

Well after dark, our reporter and photographer followed the Caldor fire as it engulfed trees with a crackling sound that crescendoed into a roar.
Sometimes fire officials get creative. Sometimes not, which is how a fire came to be named “Not Creative.”
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By Jessica Cheung, Kaitlin Roberts, Luke Vander Ploeg, Lisa Chow, Elisheba Ittoop, Marion Lozano, Dan Powell and Chris Wood
Premiums are already rising. And now insurers are looking at whether homeowners are keeping up the maintenance on, say, roofs.
Times Video Biden Says Wildfires Are ‘Blinking Code Red’ for Nation President Biden, on his first trip to the West Coast as president, surveyed damage from wildfires in California, saying the U.S. could not “ignore the reality that these wildfires are being supercharged by climate change.” forest fire articles 2021
By Matthew Bloch,  Bea Malsky,  Rumsey Taylor,  Tim Wallace and Josh Williams
Despite a visit meant to emphasize his actions on wildfires, experts say there is little the president can do for now to reduce the damage as climate change gets worse.
Explore maps of wildfires, air quality and smoke forecasts in California, Oregon, Washington and surrounding states.
At least two wildfire complexes are threatening some of the giant sequoia groves in Central California.
Temperatures are expected to exceed 100 degrees in many parts of the state this week. And a top fire official warned that wildfires would continue to threaten communities for the rest of the year.
Here’s what we know about wildfire smoke and a few tips to protect yourself.
Some of the world’s largest trees are at risk after the fires were sparked by lightning last week.
Search Search Clear this text input California’s Wildfires Had an Invisible Impact: High Carbon Dioxide Emissions From June to August, the blazes emitted far more planet-warming carbon dioxide than in any other summer in nearly two decades, satellite data shows.
More firefighters and the end of summer tourist season were among the reasons the U.S. Forest Service cited in announcing the reopenings.
Chief Thom Porter, the director of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, said about two million acres have burned in the state so far this year and that officials expect “large fire activity to continue for the next three months.”
As flames consumed rural towns in California this summer, it became clear how far residents would go to preserve their way of life.
Times Video Dry Air and High Winds Amplify Wildfire Risk in Northern California The National Weather Service issued a red flag warning for the Sacramento region and other parts of Northern California through 11 p.m. Friday, as a combination of warm temperatures, very low humidity and strong winds increased the risk of new fires. write an article on forest conservation act